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Being Real in Your Faith: Why Authenticity Matters


In today's world, it's easy to feel like we need to put up a facade and pretend to be someone we're not. This can be especially true when it comes to matters of faith. We may feel pressure to present a picture-perfect version of ourselves to those around us, or to put on a show of religiosity that we don't really feel in our hearts. However, when we do this, we're not being true to ourselves or to God. In fact, being real in our faith is crucial if we want to experience true spiritual growth and connection.


Being real in your faith as a United Methodist means living out your beliefs in a way that is true to your conviction and authentic to your personal experiences. United Methodists believe that our faith is not simply a set of beliefs to be memorized and recited, but rather a way of life that is grounded in the teachings of Jesus and the community of believers.


One way to live out your faith authentically is by participating in the life of St. Paul's. This can include attending worship services, joining a small group or Bible study, volunteering in the community, or giving financially to support the work of the church. As a United Methodist, you are part of a larger community of believers who share a common faith and work together to make a positive impact in the world.


Being real in your faith as a United Methodist means living out your beliefs in a way that is true to your conviction and authentic to your personal experiences.

Another important aspect of being real in your faith is being honest about your doubts and questions. United Methodists believe that it is healthy to engage in thoughtful reflection and discussion about our beliefs, and that doubt can be an opportunity for growth and spiritual transformation. By being open and honest about our struggles, we can deepen our faith and become more compassionate and understanding individuals.


Ultimately, being real in your faith as a United Methodist means living a life of love, grace, and service to others. It means being committed to the well-being of our communities and the world, and striving to live out the teachings of Jesus in everything we do.


Being real in our faith also means being authentic with others. We need to be willing to share our struggles and doubts with our fellow believers, rather than trying to present a perfect image.

So, what does it mean to be real in your faith? It starts with honesty. We need to be honest with ourselves about where we're at in our spiritual journey, what we're struggling with, and what we really believe. This can be scary, especially if we're worried about being judged by others. However, when we're honest with ourselves, we can start to address the areas where we need to grow and make real progress.


Being real in our faith also means being authentic with others. We need to be willing to share our struggles and doubts with our fellow believers, rather than trying to present a perfect image. This can be difficult, but it's important for building genuine relationships and supporting one another through the ups and downs of life. And as a church family, it starts with us being real people, real church and real Jesus to one another, our community and the world around us. Making a space for being real.


Ultimately, being real in your faith as a United Methodist means living a life of love, grace, and service to others.

Finally, being real in our faith means being authentic with God. We need to come to God with our true selves, not the person we think we should be. This means being honest in our prayers, admitting when we're struggling, and seeking God's help and guidance to grow in our faith.



In conclusion, being real in our faith is crucial if we want to experience true spiritual growth and connection. It may be scary, but it's worth it. By being honest with ourselves, others, and God, we can build deeper relationships and become the people God created us to be.


What does being real in your faith mean to you?

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